The Harsh Realities of a Domestic Violence Conviction

Categories: Colorado Domestic Violence Defense

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Criminal Defense Attorney Fighting Domestic Violence Convictions for the Accused throughout Colorado

Domestic violence charges are very serious.

Even if you are innocent, there is not much evidence required for you to be convicted of domestic violence. So if you are charged, you need to seek out the counsel of a qualified attorney to help you.

Domestic violence is considered a pattern of abusive-like behaviors that are used to exert power and control over a person. The individual is a relative or intimate partner, but does not have to be husband and wife.

Also, domestic violence is not just physical. It can include emotional distress, psychological trauma, and sexual assault.

The Consequences of a Domestic Violence Conviction

Sadly, domestic violence carries extremely harsh penalties. If you are convicted of domestic violence, your life will change forever – even if you are a first-time offender. Therefore, it is imperative that you know the consequences of a conviction and what that single conviction means for the rest of your life.

You May Serve Probation

While you might not serve a long jail or prison sentence, you could still face years of probation. While most misdemeanors have shorter probation terms, domestic violence charges come with probationary periods of much longer duration.

You Cannot Own a Firearm

If convicted, you cannot carry or own a firearm. This is due to the Lautenberg Amendment, which makes it a felony for any domestic violence offender to carry, ship, transport, possess, or receive a firearm or ammunition.

If you are a military service member, police officer, or work in a career that requires you to carry a firearm, you will be unable to perform your job.

You May Face Restraining Orders

Even if you have not yet been convicted or gone to trial, you could have No Contact and Restraining Orders issued against you. This prevents you from speaking to your spouse (or other victim), or even going to your family home until the court resolves the order.

You Will Complete Treatment Classes

If you are convicted, you must complete a court-ordered domestic violence course. The course you take must be state-approved. These courses cost money, and that money comes from your pocket. Some programs require a year or longer of treatment and can cost several hundred to thousands of dollars.

Fewer Employment Opportunities

As a convicted domestic violence offender, you will find that very few jobs are available to you. Some employers strictly prohibit anyone with a domestic violence conviction, while others prohibit felony charges only. Some career fields will not employ anyone with a domestic violence record, including teaching jobs, nursing, social work, public office, firefighting, and law enforcement.

Avoid the Harsh Realities, Speak with a Criminal Defense Attorney

Domestic violence charges are very serious. The consequences of a conviction could affect you the rest of your life. You could find yourself without housing, employment, and disqualified for aide.

To avoid these life-altering consequences, speak with a criminal defense attorney that understands how unfairly the system is stacked against you.

Speak with attorney Christian A. Schwaner, P.C. today during a no-obligation consultation at 719-577-9700 or request a consultation online.